Goodall Brazier Logo Goodall Brazier Logo
Home / Blog /

Blog

What can talent managers do to ensure that mental health is supported in the oil and gas industry?

25th May 2018 | Richard Goodall

What can talent managers do to ensure that mental health is supported in the oil and gas industry?

HR managers in the oil and gas industry are now seeing increased numbers of poor mental health within both senior management and workers. This all-time high could be attributed to a number of factors, including a downturn in the industry, lack of investment in new projects and the squeeze put on jobs and responsibilities within the sector. Lack of opportunities Due to the downturn in investments and industry progression, many employees are struggling to find the work they would prefer, with work in their ideal area or favourable territory unavailable. Some positions offered are in fact a step down for those working in the industry, meaning that they are not developing new skills and are often performing tasks of someone with a much lower skill set. Moreover, work that is available to them is often at a reduced rate, which means they either have to take a job at a lower salary point or have no work at all, leaving many workers between a rock and a hard-place and forcing them to take jobs far below their pay grade. Understandably, this stagnant and negative downturn in the industry has caused a complete breakdown in employee morale. The inability to earn […]

HR managers in the oil and gas industry are now seeing increased numbers of poor mental health within both senior management and workers. This all-time high could be attributed to a number of factors, including a downturn in the industry, lack of investment in new projects and the squeeze put on jobs and responsibilities within the sector.

Lack of opportunities

Due to the downturn in investments and industry progression, many employees are struggling to find the work they would prefer, with work in their ideal area or favourable territory unavailable. Some positions offered are in fact a step down for those working in the industry, meaning that they are not developing new skills and are often performing tasks of someone with a much lower skill set.
Moreover, work that is available to them is often at a reduced rate, which means they either have to take a job at a lower salary point or have no work at all, leaving many workers between a rock and a hard-place and forcing them to take jobs far below their pay grade.
Understandably, this stagnant and negative downturn in the industry has caused a complete breakdown in employee morale. The inability to earn the wage which one has worked towards and become accustomed to and of which they have established a lifestyle on can lead to those with skill sets that are interchangeable leaving the industry entirely to seek out more stable working conditions.

Unfamiliar working environments

Work-related mental ill health can also be spurred on by the requirement to work in areas of the world where they feel less comfortable or are unable to integrate effectively into the local culture. Many find this to be a daily exhausting experience, despite the fact they may not be displaying any signs of feeling exhausted or affected by the experience.
If talent managers cannot place these individuals in any alternative areas of the world, they should seek to implement methods to make their transition much more fluid and easy. For instance, language lessons can support employees who are moving to a country where their native language is not commonly spoken. Furthermore, attending lessons on culture and opportunities to visit the areas and meet with current employees also located in the vicinity can also relieve some anxieties associated with relocating. Finally, talent managers should look to implemented technology-based solutions, such as creating forums and ways to communicate with others within the local community, which will support in building friendships and expanding their knowledge of the surrounding area and its offerings.

Lack of career planning

As with any industry, employees and management alike require a plan of where their career will take them and what success looks like in that sector. Moreover, many employees are often experiencing mental-health based illnesses due to their concern over progression, salary increases and continuing at their desired trajectory in order to retire at their preferred age.
Talent managers need to ensure that they spend time, not just with executives and senior management, but also with individuals employees to establish career plans, offer them the capability to build on in-demand skills and develop their own path which ensures they meet their personal goals whilst supporting the wider business objectives.

If your gas and oil talent management systems are not yielding the desired results, get in touch with Goodall Brazier today for useful and professional advice.