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Can international search and selection be utilised to support healthcare recruitment?

13th February 2018 | Richard Goodall

Can international search and selection be utilised to support healthcare recruitment?

The recent climate of the healthcare industry is unstable, with the requirement for more doctors and nurses and a lack of access to talented and qualified individuals to fill these roles. With fewer options for acquiring these individuals from UK-based talent pools, recruiters are now focusing more attention on their international search and selection processes in an attempt to secure candidates from overseas. Recent reports highlighted that NHS recruiters looking overseas to meet their requirements for radiologists. Further claims revealed a mass exodus of experienced nurses, spurred on by the extensive barriers to entry for nurses from overseas to actually obtain work in the UK. Avoid ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to culture One of the major mistakes that an international search and selection strategy can make, is the failure to adapt it to meet the requirements for the culture of each country that is being targeted within the process. Building a bespoke approach you international search and selection ensures that the efforts are tailored to fit the unique requirements of individuals from across the globe. This could include the preferred method of media consumption, the best platform to reach these individuals and the languages to include within the communications. Moreover, it is […]

The recent climate of the healthcare industry is unstable, with the requirement for more doctors and nurses and a lack of access to talented and qualified individuals to fill these roles. With fewer options for acquiring these individuals from UK-based talent pools, recruiters are now focusing more attention on their international search and selection processes in an attempt to secure candidates from overseas.

Recent reports highlighted that NHS recruiters looking overseas to meet their requirements for radiologists. Further claims revealed a mass exodus of experienced nurses, spurred on by the extensive barriers to entry for nurses from overseas to actually obtain work in the UK.

Avoid ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to culture

One of the major mistakes that an international search and selection strategy can make, is the failure to adapt it to meet the requirements for the culture of each country that is being targeted within the process.
Building a bespoke approach you international search and selection ensures that the efforts are tailored to fit the unique requirements of individuals from across the globe. This could include the preferred method of media consumption, the best platform to reach these individuals and the languages to include within the communications.
Moreover, it is important to research into what is valued most within these cultures. An international search and selection process should highlight the key benefits that a company can offer which would result in a candidate making a significant relocation effort in order to work with your healthcare firm. This should include working hours, holiday, language courses and social activities to support integration and make relocating more amicable. Tailoring international search and selection utilising data insights into local practises and culture can overall, ensure a more successful recruitment drive.

Ensure an edge over competition

When conducting an international search and selection recruitment drive, the company’s unique ‘selling’ point must be clearly communicated. This is the services and benefits of the company that they offer to their employees and the values they represent within their processes, which will set them above their competitions and position them as the prefered employer when seeking positions within the UK healthcare industry.
Passive attraction efforts currently plague 75% of the global talent market. This means that a highly proactive approach to international search and selection recruitment can allow a company to tap into these currently passive markets. Building relationships with candidates within targeted countries will support in pulling together more refined pools of candidates which can be tapped into periodically to source individuals as and when they are required.

Embrace technology to support integration

The use of technology to support overseas healthcare workers can support their integration into a new culture and community. Offering online sources and tools which will allow them to overcome language barriers as well as include useful resources for day-to-day life can be a huge selling point for employees. Through optimising a candidate’s experience, and being sure to promote this across recruitment materials will work to debunk misconceptions of working in the UK and reassure them that they will not be left out in the cold during a move to a new country.

If your international search and selection recruitment efforts are not as effective as they could be to support sourcing talent within the healthcare sector, get in touch with Goodall Brazier today.